Five Pro Tips to Master Promises in Js

#javascript , #node , #tutorial , #beginners

Events handling and promises in particular are hands down the best JavaScript feature. You’re probably familiar with the concept itself, but in short, a Promise in JavaScript is a promise to call back with the result.

Therefore, a promise can be constructed with two functions: one to be called on success and the other - in case of error. Here is a promise that would randomly fail or reject after one second:

const promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(() => {
    const randomBool = Math.random() > 0.5;
    console.log(randomBool);
    // Return any value, or no value at all
    if (randomBool) resolve("I am resolved!");
    // Reject with an error, some value or nothing at all
    else reject("On no!");
  }, 1_000);
});

Try this in your browser console or in node repl (run node with no arguments). You should see true or false logged to a console after a second and, if promise failed, you’ll see an error message (or a warning that promise was not caught in node). Now that we got something to play with, the tips I’ve promised (pun intended):

Tip #1: Promise starts right away

As you’ve seen in the example, a promise will resolve or reject even if it have not been chained with .then, .catch or await. As soon as you’ve created the promise, it’ll start doing whatever it had been told to do.

Tip #2: Once complete, promise will yield the same result over and over

Try running promise.then(console.log) in the same console or repl where you defined the promise from previous example. It’ll log the exact same result over and over, without a delay. Try logging console.log(promise), what do you see? I bet it’s either:

Promise {<rejected>: "On no!"}

Or , if it has resolved,:

Promise { "I am resolved!" }

You’ve probably guessed by now, that a promise can be in one of the three states: pending,rejected or fulfilled (resolved to a value). The trick here is that it’ll stay in its final state till the garbage collector wipes it from existence đŸª¦.

Tip #3: Promise.prototype.then accepts two callbacks

You can get promise results by chaining then and catch to it:

promise.then(console.log).catch(console.error)

Or, simply:

promise.then(console.log,console.error)

Tip #4: Promise.prototype.then and Promise.prototype.catch return a new promise

If you console.log(promise.then(()=>{},()=>{})), you’ll get Promise { <pending> }, even if the promise have been resolved. This, however, does not mean that the async operation itself will be retried, just that these methods always create a new promise, even if your callback functions are synchronous.

promise === promise.then(()=>{},()=>{})
// false
promise === promise.then(()=>promise,()=>promise)
// false

Tip #5: Use Promise.all, Promise.race and async/await when appropriate

Before ES5 introduced async-await syntax we all lived in a callback hell:

promise.then(() => {
  promise.then(() => {
    promise.then(() => {
      promise.then(() => {
        console.warn("Callback hell in action");
      });
    });
  });
});

But it’s important to remember that async/await is just a syntax sugar over that construction. In it’s core, it still is the same chain, meaning that the next promise won’t be created until the previous one is fulfilled:

const createTimeoutPromise = (n, timeout) =>
  new Promise((resolve) =>
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log(`Promise #${n} is fulfilled`);
      resolve(n);
    }, timeout)
  );

(async () => {
  const now = Date.now();
  await createTimeoutPromise(1, 1_000);
  await createTimeoutPromise(2, 1_000);
  await createTimeoutPromise(3, 1_000);
  console.log(`Operation took`, ((Date.now() - now) / 1_000).toFixed(1), "s");
})();

// Promise #1 is fulfilled
// Promise #2 is fulfilled
// Promise #3 is fulfilled
// Operation took 3.0 s

Therefore, if you just want it all done, no matter in what order, use Promise.all to speed things up:

(async () => {
  const now = Date.now();
  const results = await Promise.all([
    createTimeoutPromise(1,1_000),
    createTimeoutPromise(2,999),
    createTimeoutPromise(3,998),
  ]);
  console.log(results)
  console.log(`Operation took`, ((Date.now() - now) / 1_000).toFixed(1), "s");
})();

// Promise #3 is fulfilled
// Promise #2 is fulfilled
// Promise #1 is fulfilled
// [ 1, 2, 3 ]
// Operation took 1.0 s

As you can see, you’ll still get the results of the promises in the same order as you specified them, despite of the order in which they were fulfilled.

In rare cases, you may not need all of your promises to fulfil, but any of them. Let them Promise.race for the sire’s favour đŸ‘‘:

(async () => {
  const now = Date.now();
  const results = await Promise.race([
    createTimeoutPromise(1,1_000),
    createTimeoutPromise(2,999),
    createTimeoutPromise(3,998),
  ]);
  console.log(results)
  console.log(`Operation took`, ((Date.now() - now) / 1_000).toFixed(1), "s");
})();

// Promise #3 is fulfilled
// 3
// Operation took 1.0 s
// Promise #2 is fulfilled
// Promise #1 is fulfilled

Keep in mind, that if any of the promises fail, both Promise.all and Promise.race will reject.

That’s all I had for today, but I promise there’ll be more (see what I did here?).